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Thread: 1936 - The British Olympic Team

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    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Great Britain 1936 - The British Olympic Team

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    Last edited by Karsten; 21-06-2006 at 07:51.

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    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    1975 was a pivotal year in international hockey as it signified the end of the old IIHF regime under the leadership of 'Bunny' Ahearne and the beginning of a new and more progessive era.

    During his three terms (1957-60, 1963-66 and 1969-75), Ahearne did a lot of good things to promote the IIHF world championships. He was instrumental in getting USA and Canada back to the worlds after WW II, he was an early advocate of the involvement of television in international sports events knowing that this would help to increase the status of the IIHF world championships (once done, he even secured the IIHF lucrative broadcasting rights to the games) and he also popularized the idea of selling advertising space on the boards of the arenas, raising the revenue from the games even further.

    But the eccentric Irishman was also extremely obstinate, running the IIHF as it was his own little kingdom. During his tenures, many arbitrary decisions were made - or decisions that at least looked arbitrary. Communicating with the IIHF members were never Bunny's biggest asset.

    By 1975, the IIHF members had had enough of Ahearne.

    Here is what the IIHF writes in their history section on www.iihf.com:

    In the middle of the 1970s, the reign of President Ahearne was already violently disputed. Since he enjoyed to run the federation just like his travel office as the "boss", there was growing opposition against him and against a further extension of his presidency.
    At the 1975 congress in Gstaad, it happened at last. Ahearne wanted – once he realized that it would be a hopeless venture to run for re-election – to build, as his "legacy" to the federation, the Dutchman Fred Schweers up to head the federation. However, an opposition candidate presented himself in the person of the German Dr. Günther Sabetzki. Dr. Sabetzki came out on top already in the first ballot with the clear result of 36:16 votes, and a new era had begun in the international ice hockey. The almost two decades long lasting "era Sabetzki" was then not only the incomparably longest, but until then also the most successful period of the ice hockey in every respect, i.e. from the sports, the organizational as well as the economical point of view.
    Canada’s return

    The first great success of the new president was Canada’s return to the official IIHF events. After the Canadians were refused the permission to enhance their world championship selection with professional players from those NHL teams that did not reach the play-off rounds of the North American professional championship (Stanley Cup), they refused to compete in the world championships as from 1970. The long, tenacious negotiations between Dr. Sabetzki and the top officials of the professional ice hockey resulted in a solution which was satisfactory for both parties: the Canadians and the Americans were allowed to enhance their world championship teams with professional players; in order to be able to achieve that most effectively, the world championships should in future take place as late as possible thus ensuring that a suitable player selection from among the NHL teams eliminated from the Stanley Cup would be available.
    In their turn, the Canadians and Americans undertook to participate regularly in the world championships. In addition, they relinquished their application to host any world championship tournaments.
    Canada Cup

    In return, a competition for the "Canada Cup" should be played every four years on North American territory with the participation of Canada, the United States and the four strongest European national teams according to the last preceding world championship with the understanding that all the teams would be allowed to use their NHL professional players. Between 1976 and 1991, the Canada Cup was played five times; in 1996 it was replaced by the newly created World Cup – with some modifications in the organization method.

    Ahearne in his last IHWC appearance as president of the IIHF: still at his old wit, here showcasing a model of the Mercedes busses that transported the players at the world championships in West Germany

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    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramses
    But the eccentric Irishman was also extremely obstinate, running the IIHF as it was his own little kingdom. During his tenures, many arbitrary decisions were made - or decisions that at least looked arbitrary.
    Wonderful man. Argued in the 1936 Olympics that since GB had beaten Canada earlier in the tournament (2-1 in the group-based semi-finals), we didn't need to play them in the group-based final round. And won! As result, GB became still the only team outside of the Elite 7 to have won Olympic gold. That 2-1 win was also the only time that the Brits have beaten Canada in a World Championship or Olympic event.

    Graham.
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    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham
    Wonderful man. Argued in the 1936 Olympics that since GB had beaten Canada earlier in the tournament (2-1 in the group-based semi-finals), we didn't need to play them in the group-based final round. And won! As result, GB became still the only team outside of the Elite 7 to have won Olympic gold. That 2-1 win was also the only time that the Brits have beaten Canada in a World Championship or Olympic event.

    Graham.
    Did you say 'Brits'? All but one of the 12 players on the British team were Canadians. Perhaps UK's hockey team should have used this flag:



    Btw, did Bunny in fact introduce the terrible IIHF tradition of boosting national teams with Canadian born players?

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    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramses
    Btw, did Bunny in fact introduce the terrible IIHF tradition of boosting national teams with Canadian born players?
    Very possibly. And I agree with your comment about "Brits". My comment was made tongue in cheek...

    Graham.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramses
    Did you say 'Brits'? All but one of the 12 players on the British team were Canadians. Perhaps UK's hockey team should have used this flag:



    Btw, did Bunny in fact introduce the terrible IIHF tradition of boosting national teams with Canadian born players?
    Going slightly off on this tangent, which of the following was the lone Brit on that 1936 Gold Medal winning team?
    • Alexander Archer
    • James Borland
    • Edgar Brenchley
    • James Chappell
    • John Coward
    • Gordon Dailley
    • John Davey
    • Carl Earhardt
    • James Foster
    • John Kilpatrick
    • Archibald Stinchcombe
    • Robert Wyman

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    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz
    Going slightly off on this tangent, which of the following was the lone Brit on that 1936 Gold Medal winning team?

    Answer: Archibald Stinchcombe (RW)

    Stinchcombe (1912 - 1994) was only a sophomore in 1936. He was selected for the British All Star Team in his first season (1934-35 - for Streatham) and that was enough to ensure him a place at the Olympic team as the only true Brit.

    The most interesting trivia about him is that he had impaired vision, he could only see with one eye. Yet, he had quite a successful career in British hockey. After WWII, he played with the Wembley Lions and Wembley Monarchs. He became one of the first British hockey players to score more than 100 goals in the post war period. In 1948, he captained the British Olympic team in St. Moritz. He retired in 1949. Thereafter he became a coach for Nottingham Panthers, leading them to the English National Championships in 1951 and 1953. Stinchcome was inducted into the British Ice Hockey Hall of Fame in 1951.

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    The 1936 British Olympic team composition has always confused me. If I recall correctly, the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association raised objections about the eligibility of goalie Jimmy Foster and right-winger Alex Archer. The CAHA, I believe, under Canadian domestic rules, wanted both players disqualified because they transferred to a league in another country (from Canada to the U.K.) without permission and were under suspension in Canada for doing so. At first the IIHF rendered both players ineligible just a day before Great Britain's first game (vs. Sweden). Great Britain then threatened to withdraw from the Games. But shortly before the British-Sweden game started, Canada withdrew their protest and allowed Britain to use the 2 disputed players.

    But back to the issue of the team's composition, this is what I have learned from the Times of London and BBC archives:

    The '36 British team included 11 Canadian players in their squad, although all but two of them were born in Britain (Foster born in Scotland and Dailley born in Canada), plus the coach Percy Nicklin, also a native Canadian. All the players, except for Erhardt and Wyman, had been taught hockey in Canada.

    Four members of the team had been born in London within a few miles of each other, although they didn't know one another before being taken to Canada by their parents. Wyman and Archer were born in the West Ham neighbourhood, Davey in Barking Essex, and Brenchley in Sittingbourne Kent.

    The youngest member of the squad and also believed to be the youngest player in the 1936 tournament was John Kilpatrick, who was just 18 when he played against Sweden in the opening match -- it was his only appearance.

    The oldest member was their captain, Carl Erhardt, who celebrated his 39th birthday during the Games.

    What is interesting is that there were only 7 teams operating in the English League at the time of the Garmisch Olympics. The British Ice Hockey Association under its new president, successful business executive Philip Vassar Hunter, hired a new secretary for the Association, travel agent J.F. "Bunny" Ahearne. These two men teamed together to find good hockey players who were British-born, and made a league requirement that each of the 7 teams must have a minimum of 4-British born skaters, which in turn would create a pool of at least 28 players to choose from for the 1936 Olympic team. So they recruited and brought across the Atlantic several British-born players to play in the English League who would eventually form the nucleus of the Olympic club.

    The coach was Canada's finest, Percy Nicklin, who decided to build his team around goalie Foster, adopt a defensive strategy and choose strong, tireless, two-way skaters who would cover closely and backcheck furiously every time their own goal was threatened. The formula proved to be extremely successful.

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    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Thanks, Svetovy. That was an enlightening post. The topic is indeed confusing, and I have never really looked into it.

    Please allow me to supplement your post by going through the British roster - player by player. The bios are obtained from The British Ice Hockey Hall of Fame.

    Alexander Archer - F
    Born 1911 in West Ham, London, by Scottish parents. At the age of 3, the family emigrated to Winnipeg, Canada. Two-times Manitoban All-Star. Returned to the UK in 1935 joining the Wembley Lions where he spend 5 seasons, scoring 82 goals and 77 assists in the English National League.
    His selection to the GB squad for the ‘36 Olympics provoked strong protests from the Canadians, who claimed Archer had not been released by their association. In all, Alex Archer played 24 times for his country, scoring an impressive 14 goals and 10 assists.
    His playing career was brought to an end in 1945, when playing at Wembley against Sweden, he suffered a fractured skull. He immediately turned his talents to coaching, spending time with Wembley, Nottingham and Murrayfield

    Jimmy Borland (D)
    Born in Manchester, UK, 1911. Learned to play ice hockey in Montreal, CA. Returned to the UK in 1933, joining the Grosvenor House Canadians that won the English League title in 1934. In 1935 he played for Great Britain in the IHWC in Milan, scoring two goals. He then took a year off from playing hockey before returning to captain the Brighton Tigers in the 1935/36 season. Playing in three games for the ’36 Olympic and World gold medal winning team, Borland score one goal.

    Edgar Brenchley (RW)
    Born in Sittingbourne, Kent, 1912. Family emigrated to Canada when Edgar was a child. He returned to Britain in 1935, after a season in the American Hockey League with Hershey, to join the Richmond Hawks before moving to the Harringay Greyhounds a year later.
    An ever-present of all seven games in the ’36 Olympics, Brenchley scored the only goal of the game in the first game against Sweden, but crowned the tournament with the game-winning goal against Canada with barely 90 seconds left on the game clock.
    After the Second World War, ‘Chirp’ returned to North America to coached Atlantic City and later joined the scouting staff of the Washington Capitals in their inaugural NHL season.

    James/Jimmy Chappell - RW/C
    Born 1915 in Huddersfield, Yorkshire. Aged 10, his family emigrated to Canada settling in Ontario where the youngster took up hockey. Moving up through the ranks, he played for the Oshawa Collegiates between 1931-34 and the Whitley Intermediates. Returned to UK 1935 joining the Earls Court Rangers where he played three seasons, before moving north to Scotland to play two inaugural seasons, firstly with Fife and then Dunfermline. Scored 2 goals in 6 appearences at the 1936 OG. Added 3 more goals in the 1948 Olympics.
    Participated in the D-Day landing during WWII. After the war, he played with Brighton Tigers, winning league titles in 1947 and 1948. He later returned to Canada.

    Johnny 'Red' Coward - LW
    Born 1910 in Ambleside in the Lake District, but grew up in Fort Frances, ON, Canada. He returned to UK in 1935 spending two seasons with the Richmond Hawks in the English League. Coward played 6 out of 7 games in the 1936 OG, scoring 1 goal. With the outbreak of war, he spent four years overseas as an instructor in the Military Police, before returning to Fort Frances to work in a paper mill until 1969. Moving back into the world of sport, he ran a pro-golf shop and coached minor leag

    Gordon Dailley - D
    Born 1911 in Calgary, Canada. Came to UK in 1933 where he joined the Grosvenor House Canadians. The following year, he moved across London to play out of the newly opened Wembley Arena, firstly for the Canadians, then with the Lions from 1935-37 and finally with the Monarchs, as captain until the outbreak of war.
    After the ’36 Olympics Dailley captained Great Britain to a third European gold medal in the 1938 championships staged in Prague, and followed that up by leading the side that competed in the World Championships in Berlin a year later. In all, he represented his adopted country, having qualified by residence, in five World Championship tournaments and recorded 16 goals and 5 assists.
    Joining the Canadian army, Dailley excelled in the military, rising to then rank of Major. He went on to serve with the United Nations peace-keeping force in Korea and was promoted to Colonel in 1955 and was subsequently posted to Yugoslavia as Canada’s military attache.

    Gerry Davey - RW
    Born 1914 in Barking, Essex. Learnt to play hockey with the Elmwood Midgets in Port Arthur Canada after his family emigrated when he was a child. Returned to UK in 1931 to play with the Princes club before moving to Streatham two years later after a short stint in Switzerland with Zurich.
    In the 1936 Olympic campaign, Davey fell ill, but got out of his sick bed for the game against Canada and scored in the opening minute. GB went on to win the game 2-1, a major step on the road to the gold medal.
    Davey next spent two seasons in Scotland with the Falkirk Lions before joining the Canadian Navy for the war years, playing hockey in the Toro Services League. After the war, together with his English wife, he returned to play on defence for Streatham and finished the 47/48 season with the Wembley Lions. Davey then turned his hand to refereeing for a number of years, but included a short return to playing in the 49/50 season with the Streatham Royals in the Intermediate League.

    Carl Erhardt - D
    Born 1897 in Beckenham, Kent. Captained the British squad in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. Unlike most of his team mats, Erhardt didn't learn to play hockey in Canada. He he learnt to skate and play the game while attending schools in both Germany and Switzerland. Despite being 39 years old, Erhardt often logged in excess of 40 minutes a game at the olympics.
    However, his sporting prowess was not confined to the ice rinks of London, where he played initially for Princes and later Streatham, for he was a sporting all-rounder. He excelled at skiing, water-skiing and tennis. He went on to become a founder and first president of the British Water Ski Federation. He died in 1988, aged 91 years.

    James/Jimmy Foster - G
    Born 1905 in Glasgow. The family emigrated to Canada when he was 6. Grew up in Winnipeg, Manitoba. e was to earn a reputation as one of the finest goaltenders outside of the National Hockey League with superb statistics and a considerable number of shutouts at both domestic and international level. Returned to UK in 1935 to join the Richmond Hawks.
    It was for Great Britain though, that Jimmy Foster showed just how good a ‘keeper he was. In the 1936 Olympic Games, Foster played in all seven games recording four shutouts and conceding just three goals, a vital factor in the squad securing an unexpected gold medal. In total, Jimmy Foster appeared in 31 World Championship games posting an amazing 16 shutouts and as well as the Olympics, he helped Great Britain to the European Championship successes of 1937 & 1938.
    Jimmy Foster returned to Canada in 1940 and continued his outstanding ice hockey career with the Glace Bay Miners and Quebec Aces. He died in Winnipeg, Manitoba on 4th January, 1969, aged 63

    Jack Kilpatrick - F
    Born 1917 in Bootle, near Liverpool. played two seasons in the English National League with the Wembley Lions where he was a checking forward. In those days of predominantly two-line hockey, his ice time was limited being the seventh forward and he registered modest statistics during those two seasons of 5 goals and 3 assists for 8 points with 4 penalty minutes.
    Nevertheless, Kilpatrick joined the British OG squard and became the youngest Briton ever to win a gold medal at the winter olympics.

    Archibald Stinchcombe - RW
    Born 1912 in Cudworth, South Yorkshire. He burst onto the ice hockey scene in 1935, when in his first season, playing for Streatham he was selected as the right-winger to the All Star B-team. In 1936, he was a member of the Great Britain team that swept all before them in winning the European and World Championship titles together with the Olympic Games gold medal. He continued his national team exploits playing in the ’37 and ’38 European Championship winning squads, and went on to captain his country in the 1948 Olympic Games campaign.
    After the Second World War, he played his domestic hockey with both the Wembley Lions and Wembley Monarchs and was one of the first members of the post-war 100 Goal Club. In 1948, Archie Stinchcombe moved to the Midlands joining the Nottingham Panthers as coach, but continued to play when needed to in emergencies up until 1952. In all, he spent seven years with the team in the Lace City, steering them to their first English National Championship title in the 1950-51 and repeating the act in the 1953-54 season. On both occasions he was unlucky only to be voted as Coach to the All Star B-teams.

    Robert Wyman - D
    Born 1909 in West Ham, London. Bob Wyman was to become one of the two English trained players on the 1936 Olympic gold medal winning team representing Great Britain. He was to play in the second game of the tournament – a three-nil win over Japan – before joining the BBC radio commentary team. Aged fifteen, he became the schoolboy long jump champion of England and learnt to skate and play hockey around the six ice rinks then operating in London in the late 1920’s and early 1930’s.
    In October 1934, together with the Canadians, he moved to the newly opened Empire Pool at Wembley and played there for two seasons before joining the Richmond Hawks for their final campaign in the English National League. Then followed a winter playing for the Princes club at the lower level of the London and Provincial League before the only season during wartime, that of 1939/40 saw him rejoin the English National League with the Harringay Greyhounds.
    At international level, Bob Wyman represented Great Britain in the 1935 World Championships, scoring the only goal in a one-nil victory over the French, which helped to ensure the bronze medal. As well as the ’36 Olympics, he was selected for the 1938 and 1939 World Championship tournaments, making twenty appearances for his country in total.

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    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Time to sum up:

    As Svetovy notes:

    Quote Originally Posted by svetovy
    The '36 British team included 11 Canadian players in their squad, although all but two of them were born in Britain (Foster born in Scotland and Dailley born in Canada), plus the coach Percy Nicklin, also a native Canadian. All the players, except for Erhardt and Wyman, had been taught hockey in Canada.
    I don't know about Kilpatrick, but he must have learned to play hockey in Canada before the 1936 Olympics, despite his young age. Stinchcombe, on further investigation, learned to play hockey in Windsor, ON.

    But now to the crucial point:

    Regardless of the nationality principle used, we can safely raise the Union Jack for the British Olympic team.

    Jus Sanguinis is the predominant nationality principle. I don't know whether Gordon Dailey was of British descent, but the rest of the players were.

    Jus Soli - nationality according to where you were born - all but one player was born in Great Britain.

    So it was a myth that Great Britain played with Canadian players, although many of the players learned to play hockey in Canada.


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    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    The team photo is from an old newspaper - poor quality - but its the best I can come up with.

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    I apologize for not mentioning the British team's 13th member, Jimmy Foster's backup, reserve goalie Art Child, who sat on the bench for the entire '36 tournament and never saw a minute of action.

    Child, who was 20 years old at the time and played for the Wembley Lions, was born in East Ham of London, and also was raised in Canada (Guelph, Ontario) after his family emigrated at the end of the first world war. While playing minor hockey in Canada, as a 13-year-old, Child gave up only one goal as his team's goalie during a 17-game schedule.

    I believe there are none of the 1936 British team still alive today, but I may be mistaken. Here is the list of birth and death dates that I could find:

    Alexander Archer.........B: May 1, 1910........D: July 29, 1997
    Jimmy Borland.............B: March 25, 1911....D: 1938
    Edgar Brenchley..........B: Feb. 10, 1912......D: 1975
    James Chappell...........B: March 25, 1914....D: 1973
    Arthur Child.................B: 1916....................D: 1996
    John Coward..............B: Oct. 28, 1910........D: ????
    Gordon Dailley.............B: July 24, 1911.......D: May 3, 1989
    Gerry Davey................B: Sept. 5, 1914.......D: 1977
    Carl Erhardt................B: Feb. 15, 1897.......D: May 3, 1988
    James Foster...............B: Sept. 13, 1905....D: ????
    John Kilpatrick..............B: July 7, 1917........D: ????
    Archie Stinchcombe......B: Nov. 17, 1912.....D: Nov. 3, 1994
    Bob Wyman.................B: April 27, 1909.....D: ????

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    Great Britain GB 1936 Olympic team

    I would be grateful if you could supply the source for Alex ARCHER's death date.

    I have just re-written his British IH Hall of Fame profile and cannot trace either a date or place of his death.

    One source said the early 1980s.

    Many thanks

    Martin


    [QUOTE=svetovy pohar;53832]I

    I believe there are none of the 1936 British team still alive today, but I may be mistaken. Here is the list of birth and death dates that I could find:

    Alexander Archer.........B: May 1, 1910........D: July 29, 1997

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    Great Britain 1936 - The British Olympic team

    [QUOTE=Karsten;53812]Did you say 'Brits'? All but one of the 12 players on the British team were Canadians.

    Wrong - they were all qualified to play for GB under the then existing player qualification rules. Only one, possibly two born in Canada - Dailley and maybe Davey. Carl Erhardt and Bob Wyman learnt all thir hockey in Europe.

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    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by icehocheritage View Post

    Wrong - they were all qualified to play for GB under the then existing player qualification rules. Only one, possibly two born in Canada - Dailley and maybe Davey. Carl Erhardt and Bob Wyman learnt all thir hockey in Europe.
    I don't think there's much to add. other than perhaps you should take time to read the thread again before posting. I never wrote that the players were born in Canada, quite the contrary (see post #9). Nor did I write that some of the players were ineligible. Another poster questioned that (see post #8).

    P.S. Davey was born in Barking, Essex.

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    Hello you all!

    Yes, Gordon Dailley was actually the only one born in Canada.

    But the others, except Carl Erhart, had been living in Canada ever since they were kids. And most of them returned to Canada later...

    Well, this team will probably always be the most controversial of all the gold-medal teams!

    All the best
    Jukka

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    olympic hockey team

    Is there any record of a "Louis Ridsdale" being on the coaching staff of the British Olympic hockey team? ? ? He was my uncle and I am following up on a lead from another family member.

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    Hello Jimmill!

    The head-coach was at least Percy Nicklin!

    Hope, this can lead you forward!

    All the best
    Jukka

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    THanks for the quick response. I now find that my uncle who supposedly worked with the team was Joe Ridsdale. I suspect he was not the coach, but might have been some sort of an assistant. THis has all come as a surprise as we visited with relatives over the holiday. I did not know any of my family had a hockey background.

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    Hello you all!

    Reading a book by Rob Jovanovic called Pride and Glory.

    I'ts a nice piece to read and gives a nice view to the time the 1936 GB players lived in.

    But the question that will never have a definite answer keeps coming to my mind;

    Were those players of the team, that were born in GB, but lived in Canada since they were kids, Canadians or British???

    To think about the same thing in another context:

    If my relative would win a Nobel prize, would his birthplace make him Swedish?!

    At least we don't think so.

    All the best
    Jukka

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    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jukka ruskeeahde View Post
    To think about the same thing in another context:

    If my relative would win a Nobel prize, would his birthplace make him Swedish?!

    At least we don't think so.
    I don't see how your analogy can be used for the 1936 team. They all had British passports, either through birth before emigration or through ancestry. In those days, all you needed was a passport to be allowed to compete for the country in an IIHF event. For most sports these days, that is still true and only ice hockey has put rules in place to try and stop passports of convenience.

    Graham.
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    Hello Graham!

    Just provoking a conversation, but not finding the right words, sorry!

    Anyway, a book definitely worth reading!

    The main point of my post yesterday was, that even "Pride and Glory" won't probably finish the debate about the Brit-Canadians (trying to put as neutral as possible!) of 1936. Even though, already in 1910 Les Avants an American called George Hartley played for Germany.

    All the best
    Jukka

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    Hello you all!

    An interesting point about the US in 1937 in Rob's book: they couldn't afford to enter the WC 1937. Yet they could afford to go longer trips to Prague 1938 and Basle 1939!

    All the best
    Jukka

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    See the brief bios of the players above but not one for the coach Percy Nicklin. Not sure if anyone here has some information they have found on him. Looked a little online, but most of the information I found was on his coaching in years on Allan Cup teams in years just prior to 1936 and in England for years later such as this:
    http://www.ihjuk.co.uk/halloffame/pNicklin.html
    Not much luck on birth or death date.

    Looks like he was born in either 1892 or 1893 - Percy Harold Nicklin. married 12 Nov 1912 in Fort William, ON to Eva Reekie. his parents H.I. Nicklin and Sarah Cooke. her parents Albert Reekie and Alma Barret. (what i could get free from an ancestry site, plus in addition my public library has an online marriage index for that period for Fort William and he is listed there)

    As far as family sports connections his son was a noted Canadian football player and his father-in-law was a star of the Rat Portage Rowing Club.


    Looks like others here have probably done some real research on where Gerald Davey from the team was born. Online there seems to be many sites (without sources) that have him born in Canada instead. I found an online newspaper article from 1936 that has an interview with Nicklin that may have been the origin or if not maybe perpetuated this; he mentions Dailley and Davey being Canadian-born players:
    http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...&pg=4412,96004

    Can't seem to find much of anything on Nicklin's early years: for example, was he a hockey player before he was a coach? Found an excerpt from a book (Before the Stars by Godin) online that has a Percy Nicklin playing for Fort William against St. Paul at the Hippodrome in Jan 18 & 19, 1917. Also the vintagemnhockey site mentions a Percy Nicklin playing for the Eveleth team in 1922-23. No idea if they are all the same person, 2 different people, or even 3 different people.

    That's about all I found from wasting a bit of time sitting on my butt on this computer chair.

    There is a 1936 Olympic hockey gold medal in my local Sports Hall of Fame, and think a sweater from that GB team (but not an on ice sweater - V neck with stripes and crest embroidered on left chest). Next time I'm in there I'll see whose they are. Likely either from Nicklin, Davey, or Coward since they are the ones with connections to the region. One of these days I might book an appointment with the Hall and see what interesting information they have in their archival material on the 1936 teams (Canada & GB).

  25. #25
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    doesn't appear to be a way to edit previous posts so I'll just add this:

    Went to the NWO Sport Hall briefly today before it closed. The gold medal and dress sweater there are both Johnny Coward's.

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    Only ONE of the Player's on the 1936 Gold Medal Great Britain Winter Olympic Ice Hockey Team was Born outside of Great Britain. Other Countries in Winter Olympic Ice Hockey Tournament History have used Player's Born outside of their Countries. The Tournament rules were explained to all of the Teams playing in the 1936 Winter Olympic Ice Hockey Tournament BEFORE the Tournament even began. The main reason Great Britain won the Gold Medal was because they had the Best GOALTENDER that Olympic Year in JIMMY FOSTER who was Born in SCOTLAND which is part of Great Britain !!!

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    Hello bob437!

    According to Rob's book Gordon Dailley was born in Winnipeg and Gerry Davey was born in Port Arthur, Ontario. Rob's book is the best and most thorough study of Team Great Britain 1936.

    Of the nine players born in Great Britain and raised in Canada only two remained in Great Britain. The life careers of the rest were made in Canada.

    All the best
    jukka

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    From what I have read and understand I don't think the 1936 UK Gold Medal in Ice Hockey was unfair because other Countries have used Players and Coaches Born outside of their Countries in many Olympic Tournaments and the Tournament Format was explained to the Teams and accepted by the Olympic Committee before the 1936 Olympics began. JIMMY FOSTER was the Best Goaltender that Tournament and probably the biggest reason the UK won.

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    Hello bob437!

    Facts are facts and these days GBR 1936 is just another olympic winning team for me personally.

    But was compiling a whole team the way Bunny Ahearne - among others - did fair? I suppose people will never completely agree.


    And I don't have any definite opinion today.

    All the best
    jukka

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